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We know what food accompanies the Angels’ Share…

24 August 2012

Angels%2BShare

We thought the John Dick & Son readers might enjoy this recent blog post from our friends at Dean’s who make the best handmade shortbread we’ve ever tasted.

We have always known that Dean’s Shortbread tastes heavenly, but now we know exactly why.

The ‘Angels’ Share’, as it is commonly known, is the process whereby angels take around a 2% share of whisky during the maturation process.

At Dean’s, we often wondered what angels eat to accompany their whisky – and we have finally discovered that they have been taking a share of our shortbread! (Up to 10% of our ingredients ‘evaporate’ during our baking process)

Just as it was in Helen’s kitchen in 1975, Dean’s shortbread is made using traditional production methods and a slow baking process.

And it is during this honoured, handcrafted baking process that those sleekit angels have been taking their share.

Today at Dean’s our hand-baking process is just the same as Helen’s but on a larger scale. Here’s how it’s done.

  • The ingredients are sieved and mixed to exact quantities in a scaled up mixing bowl. Once the dough is of a soft, creamy and light consistency, it is transferred onto baking trays, where it is hand-pricked with a ‘prickle docker’ and is ready for a slow oven-bake.
  • The trays are hand-racked and placed in the oven, where the shortbread is judged by eye to ensure the bake is just right.
  • When ready, the racks are lifted out with oven gloves, and while still warm, the shortbread is hand-cut with a knife and dusted with sugar using a sieve.
  • The biscuits are then left to cool naturally, just like Helen used to do, which allows the smell to permeate through the town.

With that smell and distinctive ‘melt in the mouth’ taste, can we really begrudge the angels their share?

Some people say that all great whiskeys have some kind of magic to them, and we think the same can be said for shortbread.

Now that we think about it – who’s to say that magic doesn’t come from the angels?

You may wish to follow Dean’s on Facebook or, you can get more stories and recipe ideas on the Dean’s Blog

shopnowbutton2

The Facebook Page has regular competitions, promotions, interior design tips and details of design trends and new furniture, please “Like” it to keep up to date with all of the news from John Dick & Son. Go to Facebook Page HERE If you found this article interesting please use the share buttons below to tell other people in your online community about it, there’s a good chance they’ll like it too.


Don’t forget, you can follow us on our Facebook Page, please click here

Leave a Reply

We know what food accompanies the Angels’ Share…

24th August 2012

Angels%2BShare

We thought the John Dick & Son readers might enjoy this recent blog post from our friends at Dean’s who make the best handmade shortbread we’ve ever tasted.

We have always known that Dean’s Shortbread tastes heavenly, but now we know exactly why.

The ‘Angels’ Share’, as it is commonly known, is the process whereby angels take around a 2% share of whisky during the maturation process.

At Dean’s, we often wondered what angels eat to accompany their whisky – and we have finally discovered that they have been taking a share of our shortbread! (Up to 10% of our ingredients ‘evaporate’ during our baking process)

Just as it was in Helen’s kitchen in 1975, Dean’s shortbread is made using traditional production methods and a slow baking process.

And it is during this honoured, handcrafted baking process that those sleekit angels have been taking their share.

Today at Dean’s our hand-baking process is just the same as Helen’s but on a larger scale. Here’s how it’s done.

  • The ingredients are sieved and mixed to exact quantities in a scaled up mixing bowl. Once the dough is of a soft, creamy and light consistency, it is transferred onto baking trays, where it is hand-pricked with a ‘prickle docker’ and is ready for a slow oven-bake.
  • The trays are hand-racked and placed in the oven, where the shortbread is judged by eye to ensure the bake is just right.
  • When ready, the racks are lifted out with oven gloves, and while still warm, the shortbread is hand-cut with a knife and dusted with sugar using a sieve.
  • The biscuits are then left to cool naturally, just like Helen used to do, which allows the smell to permeate through the town.

With that smell and distinctive ‘melt in the mouth’ taste, can we really begrudge the angels their share?

Some people say that all great whiskeys have some kind of magic to them, and we think the same can be said for shortbread.

Now that we think about it – who’s to say that magic doesn’t come from the angels?

You may wish to follow Dean’s on Facebook or, you can get more stories and recipe ideas on the Dean’s Blog

shopnowbutton2

The Facebook Page has regular competitions, promotions, interior design tips and details of design trends and new furniture, please “Like” it to keep up to date with all of the news from John Dick & Son. Go to Facebook Page HERE If you found this article interesting please use the share buttons below to tell other people in your online community about it, there’s a good chance they’ll like it too.


Don’t forget, you can follow us on our Facebook Page, please click here

Leave a Reply


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